Low Maintenance Herbs That Can Be Planted Together

13 Low Maintenance Herbs That You Can Plant Together

Low Maintenance Herbs

Herbs, knowingly or not, affect all of us in one way or another; these garnishes tend to be easier to grow than most people think, and some can even be planted together. Growing the right herbs together can enhance garden growth and naturally repel pests. Knowing which herbs can be planted together will lead to more successful, efficient gardening and growing.

There are numerous different combinations of easy-to-grow herbs that can thrive in close proximity. Some herbs clash when grown together; for this reason, knowing which herbs do and do not combine well is necessary for gardening success.

 In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of which herbs can be planted together, one must delve into the characteristics and behaviors, as well as the conditional needs, of their respective herb plants. Some aromatics require moist soil with high irrigation, while others need reduced sunlight and can go without water for weeks! Once equipped with the right knowledge, observing disappointing harvests will be a faraway cloud in your herb memory.

Factors to Consider Before Cross-Planting

Although many herbs are often seen in the same dish or in the same garden, the same is not always seen during the growing process. There are a few conditions to consider before planting herbs together, most notably sun exposure, watering, and temperature.

As a green rule of thumb, ensure that the herbs you plant together have similar conditional needs; breaking this rule may result in herbal destruction or demise.

Sunlight

As a pillar of plant existence, exposing your herbs to the proper amount of sunlight is necessary to ensure healthy growth and flourishment. Be sure to group plants that have similar sun needs together, like the Mediterranean herbs:

  • Thyme
  • Marjoram
  • Oregano
  • Lavender

Although your herbs may have the same tendencies to thrive in the same concentrations of sunlight, this avenue is but a piece of the puzzle.

Water Needs

As is seen from all plants east to west, the necessity of water is fundamental to life, although the quantity a plant needs to survive varies greatly. This disparity in water among herbs is another faction that dictates whether or not herbs can be planted with each other.

Take, for example, an aromatic herb like basil:

  1. Basil can be planted with oregano, due to their similarities in water retention and anatomy
  2. Basil cannot be planted with sage, as the latter thrives in dry soil

Take note of your herbal plant’s watering needs before planting contrasting herbs adjacently.

Soil/ Drainage

Just as every herb needs the right amount of water, using and losing the proper amount of water is a key to maintaining herbal health. All plants have different needs, depending on varying factors such as soil quality and moisture levels.

Taking a look at the tendencies of your specific herb and noting their optimal watering levels will guide you to removing dryness, without overwatering.

As a note, if water spills through and out of holes in the bottom of your plant pot (if your herbs are planted in a pot) or if you observe inadequate water retention in your plant, inspect the drainage system; any blocked holes or obstructions can end up pooling water in the root system.

Competition/ Non-Compatibility

Some herbs will grow aggressively over the fellow kindred, stomping out any potential herbal companions, while others are too similar, raising the risk of cross-pollination and a strange outcome.

Best described as the bullies among the herbs, a minority of fragrant plants will overtake a garden or sector; these herbs must be isolated, and if necessary shortened more often than usual, to keep a series of plants healthy.

An example of this territorial behavior is seen in mint; unless paired with other mint siblings, this herb is best grown in solitude. In this regard, the aphorism “what’s bad for the hive is bad for the bee,” comes to fruition.

Cross-pollination and non-compatibility are also issues that can spring up one is not wearisome when setting up an herbal garden system. Herbs of similar pedigrees may inadvertently cross-pollinate, producing unpalatable, if interesting, combinations.

Basil

The sidekick of the tomato and cousin of parsley, basil is a staple in various cuisines, flowing seamlessly over national and cultural boundaries. In the garden, this fragrant herb is not quite as versatile, although it has a few allies to keep it company.

Herbs to Plant With Basil

Basil subsists best with:

  • Parsley
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Garlic
  • Chives

All four herbs listed above can and will survive fruitfully alongside one another, not impeding each other or interfering with growth. Further, cilantro is capable of protecting fellow herbs and plants from pests, a win-win in the garden game.

Be wary when adding other herbs to the list above; the four mentioned are guaranteed to live in harmony but introducing even one uncompromising herb can upset the balance and result in issues.

Inspect the factors above to learn if an unmentioned herb is compatible with basil; if so, it is best to experiment first with basil exclusively, to ensure both parties are satisfied.

The Basil Effect

It should also be noted that basil, when grown in conjunction with tomatoes, has been praised for enhancing growth and taste. Across the board, the combination of cultivating tomatoes with basil has been attributed to bright, full products on either side of the relationship.

Herbs to Keep Away From Basil

While curiosity and creativity are valuable assets, the inclusion of these attributes within the realm of basil can be intrusive.

Keep basil away from:

  • Sage
  • Rue
  • Mint

Basil Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight (At least 6 hours per day)

Water: Once a week (about 1 inch per week)

Soil: Well-drained, moist

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Pairs perfectly with tomatoes

Chives

If chives were manifested into a person, they would likely turn out to be somebody like Fred Rogers; gentle-tempered, big-hearted, and a mark of good-will. In terms of planting, chives can be grown pretty much anywhere with the right conditions. Even in this regard, chives are pretty flexible.

Herbs to Plant With Chives

  • Parsley
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Basil

The main factor in growing chives with other herbs is soil moisture; while they thrive in full sunlight, chives are also capable of growing in partial sunlight. Refrain from attempting to grow chives in sandy, dry grounds.

Chive Chivalry

Another benefit of growing chives in your garden is their natural attraction of pollinators and natural repelling of pests. Their onion-like smell and projective perfume push away any lurking insects or small animals. They can also act as great grown coverage for landscapers, topping off their long stems with bright pink flowers.

Chives go full-circle during their lives, starting as seeds and ending as edible, mild-mannered garnishes for dishes. Using them as a substitute for onions or as a dip are both useful applications for this well-rounded herb.

Herbs to Keep Away From Chives

As was mentioned earlier, the only real requirement for happy chives is proper soil conditions; this means that sandier, drier herbs should not be mixed with chives.

Keep chives away from:

  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Rosemary
  • Other dry soil herbs

Chives Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sun is best (at least 6 hours), but reduced sun is okay also

Water: Regularly- when soil is dry to the touch, then soak

Soil: Well-drained, moist

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Well-rounded, Guardian of the Garden

Cilantro

Hailing from a fertile region between the continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa, cilantro is a fresh, refreshing herb with a justifiably popular name. Similarly to basil, cilantro is comfortable bunking in with analogous herbs; those that need moist soil and thorough drainage.

Herbs to Plant With Cilantro

  • Parsley
  • Basil
  • Tarragon
  • Chives

When growing cilantro, the main consideration to attend to is an adequate water supply, while being cautious not to overwater. Due to the structure of cilantro, as well as related herbs, supplying too much water can result in root issues.

For a bit of an anatomy lesson, cilantro plants, along with characteristically similar plants, have deep-running roots, and excess water can become hurtful by pooling at the bottom of these roots.

Signs of Overwatering

The first prominent sign of an overwatered plant is wilting leaves in the presence of water soil; take care to notice the last time you have watered the plant to ensure that you have indeed applied too much water.

The second notable physical symptom of overwatering is root rot, which can be identified by, well, excessively flooded roots. These roots will appear decayed and rotten.

If you are early enough, relocating your plant to a less flooded soil system can be a solution to overwatering, although it is easier to prevent than fix.

Cilantro Scene

Also known as coriander, the cilantro plant is widely used in South American cuisine, as well as in Southern Europe. While it does not offer as much in the garden ecosystem as an herb like chives, cilantro is praised on the dinner plate.

Whether you find yourself picking the “green leafy stuff” out of your burrito or snipping it from your garden, cilantro is a quality herb to plant requiring very little maintenance.

Herbs to Keep Away From Cilantro

  • Fennel
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Rosemary
  • Other dry soil herbs
  • Herbs that require low sunlight

Cilantro Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight or light shade in very hot climates*

Water: Once a week (about 1 inch per week)

Soil: Well-drained, moist; be careful not to overwater

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: 2017 Herb of the Year

*Note: Unlike many herbs, cilantro thrives best in lower temperatures, though it is also fully capable of growing in higher temperatures.

Dill

A member of the celery family Apiaceae, dill is enjoyed in both its leaf form and seed form, topping fish like salmon or tuna. Native to the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia region, dill is a good-humored herb, friendly in the garden and fresh on the plate.

Herbs to Plant With Dill

  • Parsley
  • Basil
  • Chives
  • Garlic

As another Mediterranean-based herb, dill should be planted with fellow plants that enjoy moist soil. It is worth mentioning that many vegetables do not work well with dill, most notably carrots and peppers among others.

The Dill Discussion

Dill offers many health benefits, although growing and cultivating your herbs comes with a few mentionable rules to follow.

Before sowing your dill seeds, keep in mind that dill does not transplant very well, so if you plan on growing your herb plants in the ground, it is best to start the process there.

To address the elephant in the room, you can use dill to make your own dill pickles, although that is an endeavor in itself.

A final mentionable trait of dill is its natural attraction of probiotic insects; most notably, it is the first choice herb for the black swallowtail butterfly, if you are into that kind of stuff.

Herbs to Keep Away From Dill

  • Lavender
  • Fennel
  • Sage
  • Rosemary
  • Other dry soil herbs

Dill Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (at least 6 hours)

Water: Once a week (about 1 inch per week)

Soil: Well-drained, moist

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Courage Herb; it was heavily used in gladiator meals in hopes of instilling courage and valor. May make an herb garden braver.

Garlic

The most popular herb in Europe and Africa, garlic is an herb synonymous with Italian food and vampires, although in the garden it is not a threat by any means. Pungent and protective, garlic is a great companion herb for many fellow herbal plants, as well as neighboring vegetables.

Herbs to Plant with Garlic

  • Chamomile
  • Dill
  • Basil

Garlic is a bit of an oddball when it comes to its soil needs and preferences. Contrasting some of its regionally similar herb family members, garlic prefers loose, well-drained soil. The best results will be seen with this loose soil, although firmer soil will not prevent substantial growth.

For this reason, if you plan on planting an herbal garden, including garlic may require a separation between plants or slightly slowed or reduced growth on your plant. But before you give up on garlic, if you plant it with the mentioned herbs above that also need lots of sunlight, there is a chance of successful growth.

The Garlic Game

Among herbs, garlic is a standout in health benefits and has been the subject of mass applause over the years; numerous individual studies have concluded that garlic positively impacts human health and well-being.

While there are countless proposed effects of garlic on the body, there are also some proven scientific perquisites. According to healthline.com, garlic holds the power to:

  • Combat the common cold
  • Reduce blood pressure
  • Lower cholesterol levels

Along with countless other proposed benefits, like a reduction in the likelihood of dementia and a longer life span, garlic makes its stake as a superfood herb.

Herbs to Keep Away From Garlic

  • Sage
  • Parsley
  • Lavender
  • Rosemary

Garlic Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Once a week (about 1 inch per week), water more with warm weather

Soil: Well-drained, moist, loose

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Superhero Health Herb; incredible health benefits

Lavender

Widely used as a relaxant in teas, fragrances, and supplements, lavender is best described as a calming herb, a purple plant with many purposes. Adopting the persona and profile of a flower, lavender is a valuable and flexible herb, comfortable around other Mediterranean herbs.

Herbs to Plant With Lavender

  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Marjoram

As has been mentioned a few times now, the Mediterranean herbs like to stick together; in this regard, their similarities in soil, sun, and water preferences bind them together. With these factors considered, a Mediterranean herb garden is a great, simple idea.

Maintaining consistent conditions and watering the proper amount are the only two main steps to keep in mind when growing herbs like lavender; these aromatics tend to be resilient and very low maintenance, requiring little to no upkeep between planting and harvesting.

Lavender is especially resilient, and thrives in the blazing sun, accompanied by dry soil.

The Purple Herb

To steer things back towards lavender, the periwinkle herb has innumerable applications ranging from soaps to antiseptics. For the sake of efficiency, here is a comprehensive list of everything you can imagine related to lavender.

Another interesting avenue of lavender is its quality of being a natural deterrent; insects and even mammals like mice and deer are put off by the fragrance the plants produce. This attribute makes lavender the best of both worlds; sensory soothing, while naturally defensive against predators.

Herbs to Keep Away From Lavender

  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Parsley
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Lavender Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Sparingly, once every 2-3 weeks until buds form, then once a week

Soil: Well-drained, dry

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Master of All Trades; will do exceptionally well in whatever capacity is necessary

Marjoram

An aromatic herb historically used as a digestive aid, marjoram is a beneficial herb with a funny name. Do not make the mistake of downplaying this aromatic, however, as it has a host of benefits, and easily slips into most gardens.

Herbs to Plant With Marjoram

  • Rosemary
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Lavender

Unbeknownst to many, marjoram is actually a member of the mint family, and therefore grows in many places, with little water and a host of different soil types.

Although not picky when it comes to soil type, marjoram will do the best in well-draining, preferably sandy grounds, paired with lots of sunlight. Marjoram is also in the upper tiers of herbs when it comes to being able to be grown indoors, due to its flexibility and tidiness.

The Marjoram Factor

Obscure rather than outlandish to many in the herb world, marjoram is actually a practical plant for a few purposes. This soft-spoken herb can be cultivated and used in culinary fields, and as decorations.

Greeks and Romans of yesteryear denoted this herb as a symbol of peace and happy times. While it may not become the star of your garden, marjoram is a humble, valuable asset within the realm of herbs.

Herbs to Keep Away From Marjoram

  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Parsley
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Marjoram Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Once a week (about 1 inch per week)

Soil: Well-drained, light, sandy

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Joy Mountain; given this title by the Greeks, believed to nurture love and marriage

Oregano

Often introduced on a pizza, oregano is one of the most well-known herbs around the world. Along with it, oregano harbors a host of medicinal and culinary purposes, many of which are more embedded into daily life than one may believe.

Herbs to Plant With Oregano

  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Marjoram

Another member of the mint family, oregano can be likened to the Swiss Army Knife of herbs; the purposes both on and off the plate are virtually endless, as well as practical.

As long as the soil is well-drained, oregano will grow without complaint; even in harsher conditions like rocky plains, oregano is capable of thriving. If comforted with full sunlight, oregano is not picky about much and requires little water.

Oregano: Fit for Kitchen and Cabinet

In the form of oil, dried flakes, or straight from the branch, oregano spreads its influence across a remarkable number of plains.

In the health field, essential oregano oil is sometimes used as an antifungal, antioxidant agent, potentially fighting bacterial and yeast infections. Other medicinal ways oregano is utilized is through the application of oil to relieve headaches, as well as painful ailments.

Herbs to Keep Away From Oregano

  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Dill
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Oregano Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours), although some shade is okay

Water: Sparingly (about 1 inch per week), only water when soil is dry to the touch

Soil: Well-drained, light, sandy

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Self-Diagnoser’s Dream; those who love home remedies will love experimenting with oregano and all of its uses.

Parsley

Clocking in at #9 on this list is parsley, the world’s most popular herb! This title of popularity is not backed without reason; parsley is one of the most nutritionally beneficial herbs out there, providing unique health boosts. Most prominently, parsley provides volatile oil components and flavonoids, both of which classify it as a chemoprotective food.

Herbs to Plant With Parsley

  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Chives

Parsley’s extensive capacity of vitamins and minerals, which promote a healthy body in countless ways, makes it a must in any herbal garden. As a sort of grandfather of herbs, parsley acts a solid beginner herb, as well as a staple in all sorts of gardens.

Fortunately, parsley is by no means picky when choosing companion herbs to bunk in with. As a Mediterranean herb, parsley thrives with full sun exposure and moist soil, making it a perfect companion for some other big names, like basil and cilantro.

Parsley Perks

In order to fully appreciate the benefits that parsley brings to the table, one must acquire knowledge of its many health perks.

Parsley sprigs’ health benefits include:

  • Functions as antioxidants
  • Excellent source of Vitamin C
  • Source of folic acid
  • Protection against heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis

As an added benefit, consuming parsley at the closure of a meal has been proven to cleanse a palate, leaving a fresh taste.

Herbs to Keep Away From Parsley

  • Lavender
  • Fennel
  • Sage
  • Rosemary
  • Other dry soil herbs

Parsley Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight (At least 6 hours) and partial sunlight are both sufficient

Water: 2-3 times a week, wilting is an indicator of dryness

Soil: Well-drained, moist

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Unsung Hero; often overlooked as simply a garnish, truly versatile and valuable herb

Rosemary

A beautiful, ornamental herb, rosemary is another example of an herb whose diverse uses are often overlooked. Apart from its brilliant fragrance and outer beauty, rosemary is used for dishes, especially soups and oily fish.

Herbs to Plant With Rosemary

  • Sage
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Marjoram

As a drier herb, rosemary is best suited to be companions with fellow herbs that prefer little water quantities and have great drainage.

Rosemary is especially susceptible to root rot, so before planting be sure your soil empties well.

Rosemary Rundown

Rosemary is a staple in numerous meat and poultry dishes, although it harbors a fascinating side effect in sharpened memory.

Multiple studies have suggested rosemary to be a memory-enhancing herb, at least in the oil form. Before you start snorting herbs, however, it is the aroma of the plant that has been touted as instilling focus and memory.

Herbs to Keep Away From Rosemary

  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Chives
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Rosemary Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Once every 2-4 weeks (based on climate), be careful not to overwater

Soil: Well-drained, light

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Good Influence; rubs off onto fingers, smells fresh and strong

Sage

As the second herb in the title of Simon and Garfunkel’s hit album, sage is another quality garnish in various cuisines, often enjoyed when mixed with butter. Sage is not the most friendly herb in the garden, although it does have some common allies.

Herbs to Plant With Sage

  • Rosemary
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Marjoram

Sage subsists as a best friend of rosemary, both maintaining similar needs in sunlight and soil quality. Sage is also very deep-rooted, with root systems growing up to 39 inches.

In terms of these needs, sage thrives best in medium to high levels of sun, average watering (once per week), and sandy, well-drained soil.

Herbs to Keep Away From Sage

  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Tarragon
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Sage Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Medium to full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Once every 1-2 weeks

Soil: Well-drained, light, sandy

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Traveler; sage has over 500 different varieties, spread across the globe

Tarragon

A member of the sunflower family, tarragon is an herb adored by the French and native to Eurasia and North America. With a licorice-like taste, tarragon is distinct in both flavor and application.

Herbs to Plant With Tarragon

  • Parsley
  • Cilantro
  • Basil

As a gentle herb in both taste and touch, tarragon is a great herb to keep in the garden due to its natural bodily benefits and fragrant properties.

In order to grow tall and full, tarragon should be accompanied by full sunlight, will a steady supply of water every three days. In terms of soil, well-drained and light soil will yield the best crop.

Herbs to Keep Away From Tarragon

  • Lavender
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Rosemary
  • Dry-soiled plants

Tarragon Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Every three days or so

Soil: Well-drained, light, sandy

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Little Dragon; based on its historical name, tarragon has a hidden flair only brought out by cooking it in the right way

Thyme

As the final herb on this list, thyme represents both a closure and a fresh beginning; thyme is an everchanging, inevitable faction of human life, one that can be destroyed or cultivated based on our choices. When gardening with other herbs, thyme slides into the company of fellow dry, well-drained plants.

Herbs to Plant With Thyme

  • Rosemary
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • Lavender
  • Marjoram

Robust and hardy, while retaining sharpness and explicit honesty, thyme is an herb widely used in various cultures and regions.

It is in your best interest to plant thyme with herbs that also enjoy full sun, little water, and well-drained soil. Thyme is drought-resistant, although this proposal should not be pushed for the sake of experimentation.

After all, “He who breaks a thing to see what it is has left the path of wisdom.”

Thyming of The Essence

As an immune booster and antioxidant-rich herb, thyme is an all-round Allstar in the herb game. Valued as an item of courage by the ancient Greeks, thyme just might add a strut to your step if consumed consistently.

Herbs to Keep Away From Thyme

  • Parsley
  • Cilantro
  • Basil
  • Moisture-loving herbs

Thyme Basic Attributes

Sunlight: Full sunlight is best (At least 6 hours)

Water: Scarcely; thoroughly water only when soil is dry to the touch

Soil: Well-drained, dry

Maintenance/Upkeep: Low

Special Trait: Desert Snake; with drought-resistant qualities, thyme is resilient and tough to break down

Conclusion

Whether you are planting an herb for the first time or adding a fifth plant to your pot, make sure that you are enjoying yourself, not stressing over the end result, and having fun on the ride there.

Keep in mind the three dictating factors in planting herbs together:

  1. Sunlight needs
  2. Water needs
  3. Soil needs

Good luck growing your herbs! They can really make a big difference in how your meals taste when you’re trying to become self-reliant and live off of the food that you’ve grown yourself.